A Call to Action—Stamping Out Workplace Harassment

Jason E. Reisman

“This” isn’t just about Harvey Weinstein, Roy Moore, Kevin Spacey, Al Franken, Matt Lauer, or others in the news. “This” isn’t just about politicians, Hollywood, and the media.

“This” is a real problem in workplaces across the country. Every time we hear a story that sounds surreal, we want to believe it’s some type of joke. But, it never is. Although the law—and common sense—make clear that such conduct is not acceptable, it still happens. It’s been happening in the employment setting for decades. Now, with the latest revelations being broadcast across the news, it’s finally getting more widespread attention. And, “this” needs attention, as well as focused efforts at eradication. Continue reading “A Call to Action—Stamping Out Workplace Harassment”

Trick or Treat? New York City Salary History Ban Becomes Effective October 31

Anthony A. Mingione

Earlier this year, New York City amended its Human Rights Law to make it unlawful for an employer to ask about or rely on a prospective employee’s prior salary history in making hiring decisions. The amendment bans both direct inquiries from applicants and attempts at learning applicants’ previous salaries from indirect sources, such as independent research or third party conversations.

The legislation becomes effective on October 31, 2017, so New York City employers should take advantage of the remaining time before the effective date to conform their hiring practices to the new restrictions. Continue reading “Trick or Treat? New York City Salary History Ban Becomes Effective October 31”

The NLRB Pushes Protections for Social Media Comments to the “Outer-Bounds” of the NLRA

Thomas J. Szymanski

Enacted in 1935, the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) was designed, among other things, to protect the rights of employees and employers, including protecting an employee’s right to engage in protected concerted activity in the workplace, such as complaining to other employees about her manager or terms and conditions of employment, without fear of retaliation by his or her employer. The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”), an independent federal agency with five members appointed by the president, enforces the NLRA and effectively controls its interpretation and application, subject to limited review by the courts. In less than a decade, the NLRB of the Obama administration extended the protections of the NLRA—in ways some would say were never contemplated by Congress—to employees’ work-related conversations conducted on social media, such as Facebook and Twitter. Those protections apply regardless of whether the employee is represented by a union or not. With this expansion of protection for social media activities, employers must carefully consider the NLRB’s decisions, or else proceed at their own peril. Continue reading “The NLRB Pushes Protections for Social Media Comments to the “Outer-Bounds” of the NLRA”