New York City Clarifies Pay Transparency Timetable—Delays Effective Date

Mara B. Levin, Stephen E. Tisman, Anthony A. Mingione, and William J. Anthony

As previewed in our April 5, 2022, client alert (New York Employers, Take Note! Two New Laws Effective in May | Blank Rome LLP), New York City has rolled back to November 1, 2022, the effective date of its amendment to the New York City Human Rights Law (“NYCHRL”) that will require the City’s private employers to provide a minimum and maximum salary range for jobs when advertising employment opportunities.

The City delayed the effective date in order to give employers a six-month extension of time to come into compliance. The amendment will require employers that are advertising job openings for positions performed in New York City to include the salary range (both a minimum and maximum amount) being offered for the position in the advertisement.

Continue reading “New York City Clarifies Pay Transparency Timetable—Delays Effective Date”

New York Employers, Take Note! Two New Laws Effective in May

Mara B. Levin, Stephen E. Tisman, Anthony A. Mingione, and William J. Anthony

New York businesses face not one, but two new laws which significantly impact employers and take effect next month. The first requires employers in New York City to provide salary ranges when advertising employment opportunities (effective May 15, 2022). The second mandates that New York employers provide prior notice and posting if they intend to monitor employee telephone, e-mail, or Internet usage (effective May 7, 2022). Read below for important summaries of the new laws and their impact on your business.

Continue reading “New York Employers, Take Note! Two New Laws Effective in May”

NEWS FLASH: The Ban Is Back! Philadelphia Employers Can’t Ask About Salary, Wage, and Benefits History

Thomas J. Szymanski

Effective immediately, Philadelphia employers are prohibited from asking job applicants about their salary, wage, and benefits history.

As a bit of background, in 2016, the Philadelphia City Council passed an ordinance banning salary, wage, and benefits history inquiries by employers (and also barring employers from setting a new hire’s initial pay based on their salary history), which was signed into law in January 2017. However, the ban on salary and wage history inquiries has been on ice since April 30, 2018, when it was enjoined by the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Today, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit dissolved the district court’s injunction; therefore, Philadelphia employers must immediately stop asking job applicants about their salary, wage, and benefits history. The Third Circuit also upheld the lawfulness of the ordinance’s bar on using salary history to set initial pay.

Please contact a member of Blank Rome’s Labor & Employment practice group if you have any questions about compliance with Philadelphia’s salary, wage, and benefits ban or any other employment issues.

Salary History Ban Spreads—New Jersey and New York Jump on Board!

Alix L. Udelson

New Jersey and New York are the latest states to prohibit employers from asking job applicants about their pay history and considering pay information in making employment decisions.

New Jersey

In New Jersey, effective January 1, 2020, private employers cannot screen applicants based on their pay history. Employers also cannot require an applicant’s salary history satisfy a certain minimum or maximum criteria. Employers may not consider an applicant’s refusal to provide compensation information in making an employment decision.

There are several noteworthy exceptions and limitations to this law. Continue reading “Salary History Ban Spreads—New Jersey and New York Jump on Board!”

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